3
votes

The voting period has ended. Thanks for everyone taking part, and congratulations to Dario, Penelope, and Unbrutal Russian! (The bounties will be distributed shortly.)


What were the best answers of the year 2019? Nominate your favorites and vote on other people's suggestions! To nominate an answer, simply post it an answer to this question with a link and brief description of the answer. You can nominate as many answers as you want.

The nominated answers must have been originally posted in 2019. To get you started, here is a search for all answers from this period with positive score. The answer doesn't have to be accepted, and it doesn't matter if it has already received a bounty.

Everyone is invited to nominate and vote! After about a month (April 10, but I make no promise about the exact time), the three nominations with the highest scores on this meta post will be declared the winners. The three winning answers will be rewarded with bounties of 100 reputation points each, from the personal reputation stashes of the moderators. (If the scores are tied, we will reward at least three answers and give out at least 300 reputation in some way.)

Of course, anyone with 75 or more reputation is free to reward any answer they like at any time. Consider this contest also as an opportunity to highlight some hidden gems that received few votes but are excellent in quality.

Previous similar events: Best of 2016, Best of first quarter of 2017, Best of second quarter of 2017, Best of second half of 2017, Best of 2018. These events were recently discussed on meta.

This question is focused on 2019 only. We'll do a separate one for 2020 a bit later.

4
votes

In retrospective, perhaps two years ago is a little too far away.

Many —not all!— of the highest voted answers, it seems to me, got there due to the popularity of the subject rather than the quality of individual answers.

Among them, however, some stand apart for their research effort, like this answer by Dario to Historicity doubted by Romans, which hereby I nominate.

3
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I nominate Penelope's answer to "What did the Greeks and Romans call their pets?", for the many examples that are interesting both in linguistic terms and for the glimpse into culture that they provide.

3
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I'm nominating Unbrutal_Russian's answer to "Confused about the use of “quae” as an interrogative word" for its clear presentation of some complicated facts about the use of qu-words in Latin that can be difficult to pick up from declension tables; for example, the common interchangeability of quis and quī (and how this pair differs in behavior from quis and quae, or quid and quod), and the occurrence of quă in indefinite contexts.

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